SHOAIB AKRAM

I finished my Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering at Ghent University under the advisement of Lieven Eeckhout. I was also advised by Kathryn McKinley. I will soon join the Australian National University as an assistant professor. If you are interested in research opportunities at the interesection of computer architecture, programming languages, and operating systems, I encourage you to get in touch. I am especially interested in all aspects of memory systems, especially the role of garbage collection in managing emerging memory hierarchies, computational storage, scaling through 3D stacking, and approximate persistent memory. I am also interested in simulation methodologies for non-native languages, performance modeling of accelerators, and understanding and improving the performance of web applications.

A recent interview by people of PLDI
Invited talk slides, Flash Memory Summit, Santa Clara
Faculty interview slides

For legacy purposes: Before moving to Ghent in 2012, I spent two years as an Early Stage Researcher at the Foundation of Research and Technology (FORTH) in Heraklion, Greece. My research at FORTH was funded by an EU Marie Curie fellowship. I got my M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign in 2009. I was a recipient of the J. William Fulbright scholarship from the U.S. Department of State. Before all the foreign travels, I got my B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering in 2006 from the University of Engineering and Technology in Lahore, Pakistan.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

I am broadly interested in programming language implementation, runtime systems, and system software for emerging hardware. My current research investigates language runtime support to improve the performance and efficiency of heterogeneous processors and memories. I am particulary interested in breaking the boundaries between different layers of the computing stack - the user application, the runtime environment including the OS, and the core microarchitecture - to cooperatively improve the performance and efficiency of computer systems.